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20121101
20121130
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CSPAN2 22
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English 22
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
decided we would drive back to the bridegroom's house, they lived in one of the outskirts of el paso. they had one bed, parents lived in the bed, two of the children lived in the bed and the newlywed couple was going to share the bed with the parents. there were no bathroom facilities. you went to the back of the house and used the space behind the house and the restroom. when you grow up in that kind of poverty you look for any escape you can. you would willingly bag a drug dealer to come to your house and offer you money so you can buy clothes and shoes and live a nicer life. we would think many years later the situation would be better but with the current drug war it is much worse. i can relate to the problems down there with drug trafficking because i was in a similar situation. >> hipolito, you became one of the nation's most decorated officers and rose in the ranks from border patrol agent to a key post in homeland security. wondering if you could talk about how you became involved with the border patrol and the motivation you have at the time. >> good morning to everyone. i w
's house to drop off some gifts and they lived in one of the collodion is on the outskirts of el paso. they had one bad. the parents lived in the bad, two of the children lived in the bad and not the newlywed couple who's going to share the bed with the parents. there was no bathroom facilities. he simply went out to the back of the house and used the space behind the house, the dirt to use the restroom. and when you grow up in that kind of poverty, you tend to look for any escape you can. you would willingly beg that a drug dealer would come to your house and offer you money so that you can isolate close of the bison shoes, with a nicer life. we would think that many years later the situation would be better, but with the current drug war is much, much worse in mexico. so i can sort of relate to the problems of the chart traffic and because i was in seventh situation. >> you became one of the nation's most decorated ins officers and rows in the ring through a border patrol agent to a key post in homeland security. i am wondering if you could talk to us a little bit about how you beca
of the house and 100 members of the senate plus three el toro votes for the district. and promises of reform or a constitutional amendment to do away with the electoral college have always met with serious resistance, especially from states and politicians who benefit from the system and attempt to amend the constitution and abolish the electoral college, replacing it with direct election of the president was killed in the senate in 1979, but the issue rears its head every four years when people look around and wonder why america needs this antiquated contraption. and, unfortunately, i was looking in here for the name of the book. two people have no ask you. what about posting that on your website? >> if you don't mind my looking i can look in -- i think i have my book right here. perhaps i can come up with it. i believe it is called, how democratic is the american constitution? the author is a yale scholar, and i think, you know, i am under tv lights for too long. my brain is not coming up as something of a measly much better producing. >> host: okay. we are almost out of time anyway. if i
the battle of el alamein. what i know about that, i learned from the letters they wrote later before the five of them were in hospital. they had a lot of time to write letters. they didn't talk too much how they dealt with fear. more they talked about the -- how hard it was to start losing men. it seemed to be the thing that impressed them and was difficult. it was something i think they could share. my uncle talked once about looking forward to going another moment he knew they were going to be encountering the enemy and how he thought about it and he used this really mundane sort of metaphor. he referred to a swimming hole he liked to women, i think it was 20-foot and wants to jump and also not wanting to jump. that's about as close as -- i have jack's journal that he kept all the way through his time in north africa, but it became very tellgraphic when he actually got in to combat. it was slept the night in a cave, nothing but a restless sliver. little things like that. you know, fierce fire, very not a lot of introspection then, i don't think. is that helpful. >> yeah. >> good. i'm sorry.
. number ten is my favorite from el nor leonard. ten tips for writing. try leave out the part that readers send to skip. that's why the man walked off the stage with a medal. it is time to enjoy your dinner. while you're doing it. i want to you consider to this. i'm not sure if you know the process. what happens it's true the four groups of judges met for lunch today at different restaurants in manhattan times are tough. i think it was panera, and they choose the winner in the qat gory among themselves. this is hours ago. and so i kind of think that they had to speak in a secret language. you never know if the server is a blogger in disguise. i'm thinking maybe they use a kind of code to say to the colleagues whom they were voting for. it's like, excuse me, do you know what the soup of the diaz? [laughter] if you're still serving brunch, may i have the eagers benedict? how is the blueberry cobbler? it's getting bad. i lost you. i will return to the stage after dinner pun free, please enjoy your dinner. [applause] [inaudible conversations] >> good evening. on half of the board directors at
universal decoration of human rights after world world war ii thanks in part to el mrs. roosevelt after her husband's death. today more than 70 countries recognize a right health or health care in their constitutions. virtually every industrialized nation have taken steps to implement the rights by establishing some type of universal health coverage for their citizens. with one major exception, anybody know? [inaudible] the united states of america. but it's not for lack of trying, after fdr's death president harry truman announced a national health insurance program that would have made it part of the social security act. the physicians of the american medical association attacked the plan and socialized medicine that might also sound familiar. and in the early cold war, the ama won that battle and truman's proposal was defeated. other presidents ?kding nixon and bill clinton tried to pass universal health care programs. but they failed due to entrenched and vigorous opposition not just the medical profession but also opposition from business and increasingly power insurance industry. heal
floor, was met by el near roosevelt, and he looked up and she said, harry, the president is dead. and he thought -- he was in total shock. he said, what can i do for you? and she said, harry, what can we do for you? you're in trouble now. >>> he she looks at the life of harry truman in "citizen soldier." sunday night on c-span q & a. >>> now more about the bp oil spill settlement announcement with democratic congressman. bp will pay a $4 million fine and plead guilty to the charges of 11 deaths of workers and lying to congress. they returned indictment charging two bp supervisor and the former deputy of incident commander. this is 25 minutes. >> ranking member of the natural resources committee, i'm here with henry who is state of california the ranking member of the energy and commerce committee. today bp reached an agreement with the justice department to resolve all criminal claims against it by the united states government regarding the bp water horizon disaster and to pay $4 billion in criminal penalty for the very serious violations of law. bp has plead guilty to 11 felony counts r
a pleasure. keep up the good work. >> thank you. is nice to meet you. thank you, and thank you for coming. el low. hello. >> yawl crazy liberal, so my head might explode. kelly victory asked me to tell you hello. >> how do you know kelly? >> i work with a group that's appointed with in colorado. so you're here in d.c.? she's my favorite surgeon. >> i will let her know thank you very much. nice to meet you. >> really nice to meet you. >> [inaudible] no, stay on this side because you'll start a trend, it'll take too long. my handwriting is a little word because i was writing while smiling. was i blinking? >> i have no idea, i'll find out when i get home. >> hello. >> i have two, one for me and one for my aunt. [inaudible conversations] >> i'm sorry, did i spell that wrong? >> no, that's perfect. >> okay. >> okay. and then the other one's for nyna. thank you so much. >> thank you. thank you for coming. >> yeah. [laughter] >> okay, keep them moving here. >> hi. i think -- [inaudible] >> hello. >> my name's john. >> nice to meet you, john. that's a fine school. [inaudible] >> next few weeks, you k
the option of five 1/6 talk shows there has not yet then a news channel in egypt. in the past you've go to el jazeera but not any more. the same with to the show. you can devote half an hour to local issue in tunisia. i think eventually was prepared for workday concept of i want to be strong again. the saudi arabia is the largest economy particularly with advertising. the market really needs a difference diode news channel with four or six hours of business. that is picking up. that also introduces us. with the programming i would go through business. that would interest the people. >> sens i feel there is a need for more cooperation between arab media for erred train a and a journalist and media people selling to the un qualified journalist. with interest in these groups there is a great demand or a great need. i have no problem -- but qualified ones are few were the american organization could help us and assure the news organizations would be welcomed to team up with the arab media organization in the arab world of. thank you very much. [applause] >> i a do not know if you can see me. i ca
. stone. if you had 60 secondses with me in an el visit for and had to describe yourself, what would you say? >> i probably wouldn't say anything, but let me try. almost 78 years old. been a candidate a number of times. represent a party that stands for peace, and individual liberty. and social justice, and i'm a member of the socialist party. the american legion, the veterans for peace, and liberty union. i'm an officer of liberty union. i live with my spouse of 55 years. i have four children. and jesse, paula, ian, and 15 grandchildren, and they all live within area code 05301, except for one who is about 17 miles away. so my whole social life revolves around them. >> we're all product office our families and we have two branches on our family tree, our mother's side eurasian father's side, and today i wore some family heirlooms, niecetive american indian heads and my earrings to remind me tell you tonight that we have to take care of mother earth. my great-great-great grandmother on one family line was the leader of a tribe of a branch of virginians al gone quinn. so it's important to
have -- we have, the president of the united states, comes to the university of texas in el paso and makes jokes about the safety and security of our country and joking about the border, you know, we have the secretary of homeland security saying that. we've had 140 dead bodies that have been discovered in the last year alone in two rural texas counties. the statistics cited are great statistics, but no amount of statistics can cover up the bloodshed at the hands of drug cartel members, no amount of stats can be manipulated to cover -- >> statistics cited black and white numbers, they are not always accurate, the u crime report, why are not not showing up? >> ucr data covers eight categories. they do not cover drug trafficking. ucr data gus not cover money laundering, human trafficking, kidnapping, extortion not included in that data, and think about this, we have 12 # 41 miles between texas and mexico. we have great communities there. i go there often. 93% of our texas-mexico border is unincorporated and largely rural. that's the reality of the there was a run around occurring o
a president of united states coast university of texas in el paso and makes jokes about the border. we have 140 dead bodies discovered in the last year in two rural counties. the statistics are great but no amount can cover the blood is shed from the drug cartel members. know about could be manipulated. >> use if those are black and white but they're not accurate why are they not? >> you see are dated covers eight major crime categories. they do not covered drug trafficking are money-laundering. human trafficking trafficking, kidnapping or extortion and not included. if we have 1241 miles. there are great communities. 93% of the texas mexico border is unincorporated allot of cross-border running civic the videos are on your district how you respond? >> i will not dispute anybody in the video any personal experience our feelings i will not dispute them at all. at all. right after that conversation wave brought in different ranchers, todd staples could not make it but we asked ranchers what else can we do? we came up with a series of solutions i am more interested to find solutions how we do
a district that has an enormous amount of agriculture from san antonio, texas all the way to el paso texas is the idea that farmers and ranchers, food producers, their funds to guarantee they can stay in business raising their crops and raising their livestock were not secure the way they should have been secured. yet what we had, as chairman neugebauer said his state agencies the power of the world to go out and regulate mf global and refuse to do so simply because of the aura of a previous politician that came into this business and really did not show any kind of knowledge or ability to guide a company like mf global that was sick once i utility -- quantify utility and ensure that funds of the guarantees that they could stay another season or another planting season, but gave them a free pass and gave them more and more a rodeo for customers money. i'm glad that this report points out all of those defects because they need to start focusing on what is really wrong and be not afraid of what it is we discover in how our regulatory agencies function for the well-being of our economy, for t
's cleaned up. i will say, though, that i'm troubled by -- you know, this is not your father's iaea. el baradei, like him or don't like him, i'm troubled by the nature of the relationship the agency seems to have with rapp. every time you try to negotiate with iran, you walk away angry and distrustful. i mean, the europeans did it in 2003, the agency's going through it now. but that's a relationship where there will also have to be a refurbishing of trust, or it's going to be difficult down the line. at the end of the day, it's the big powers at the u.s., russia and france, whatever, if they decide to get a deal, they'll get a deal. but iaea is an independent agency, and that relationship has to be addressed as well. >> and just very quickly, jim, is -- do you think the iaea and iran are going to resolve these issues before the p5+1 and iran work out a broader framework for resolving this, or is it dependent on that? are the iranians going to stonewall the agency until they see -- >> yeah. my, my true answer is i have no idea, and then my guess is the iaea's going to come at the end of
it equals 538 votes to of 445 members of the house and 100 members of the senate plus three el toro votes for the district. and promises of reform or a constitutional amendment to do away with the electoral college have always met with serious resistance, especially from states and politicians who benefit from the system and attempt to amend the constitution and abolish the electoral college, replacing it with direct election of the president was killed in the senate in 1979, but the issue rears its head every four years when people look around and wonder why america needs this antiquated contraption. and, unfortunately, i was looking in here for the name of the book. two people have no ask you. what about posting that on your website? >> if you don't mind my looking i can look in -- i think i have my book right here. perhaps i can come up with it. i believe it is called, how democratic is the american constitution? the author is a yale scholar, and i think, you know, i am under tv lights for too long. my brain is not coming up as something of a measly much better producing. >> host: okay
with a glass-teague el reform. what would you think of that way of proceeding? >> well, it's an interesting proposition. i think most of the motivation for schemes like this are driven by the belief that the debt's too big, and the way to get around that, be able to finance things, would be through direct money creation that didn't involve the offset in terms of borrowing. so, um, this is something congress could do, congress could decide that it's not going to offset dollar-for-dollar deficit spending with increased borrowing, and that would, i suppose, reduce some hand wringing and anxiety about the size of the national debt. but if i think we had a better understanding of what the risks and challenges are in terms of a growing debt, and i really keep coming back to for me it's not the debt to gdp ratio that needs to be stabilized, it's the debt service that becomes an issue. it's not the debt to gdp ratio per se, but the debt service. so i just think that for me personally i think i prefer, um, a better understanding of how the monetary system actually works and understanding that the de
, a stop on the way to his family's unimaginable destination, his own elite school dure ray doe -- el durado. thank you very much. [applause] >> thank you. thongs -- thank you to the three authors, and we have time for two questions only. two questions only. thank you. >> hello. >> hi. >> well, thank you, that was really tremendously interesting. my question is you said something about see a lot of promise for the second term. i know none of us have a crystal ball, but seeing what you know, all three can speak to this, of the experience the last four years, what do we expect to see in the next four years, do you have any ideas? >> okay. [laughter] >> very quickly. i'm going to give an answer that sounds like it's old, but i think it's new, and that is, i think we -- many of us tend to forget that the health care act, which was enacted in the first term, will really be felt in the second term in so many ways, and i think that as that rolls out over the next two years, that that accomplishment, in and of itself, in the way it effects millions of people, much like as michael described th
] >> and tell us your name. >> marilyn hemmeasuring el. >> keep the microphone. i have a follow-up question. you give the analogy of parents paying their kids or giving their kids rewards for studying, learning, getting good grades? did you, did you ever pay your children for getting good grades? >> never, but i didn't have to. [laughter] >> they did well -- >> i meant different families, different households. but in a house o hold where this isn't encouraged and the school is doing the encouraging because the parents haven't or the kids aren't exposed, this is the responsibility of the school is to educate. parents aren't helping it along, the school has to do heroic things. >> heroic things. >> yes, heroic things. >> and heroic things may include $50 for an a? >> no, you said $2 a book. [laughter] difference. let's be reasonable. >> things within the bounds of the economy. >> yes. [laughter] >> yes. >> hi. i'm a former teacher, many, many, many years ago, and i think that in this, um, suggestion shows a lack of willingness and expectations. i think what you're talking about when parents don't
? and by the way i have two children who are at el haines. i was also trade in the parent perspective have full transparency what my kids were learning every day in class. when we started to work on this idea, and realized that it needed to be a separate organization, that thought about this at scale, we came across this question, what is the best way to organize ourselves to get the job done, right? so it was, in making the choice to become a for-profit it was not sort of from the starting point of, how can we recognize an opportunity to make money? it was, how do we take a problem that exists at e. l. haines at one of the highest performing schools in d.c. and exists at most schools in the country and try to solve that and what is the best vehicle to get there? to my surprise, i was teacher for seven years, principle and cao for five years, went to business school and spent most of the time translating from the for-profit terminology into the paradigm of nonprofits my cofounder and i decided we would be best served being a for-profit and there were a few reasons for that. one is a website we
of colorado. i'll be looking closely at the number of republican votes that are coming out of el paso county and douglas county and mesa county on the western slope. another swing county that we pay attention to is larimer connecticut which is northern colorado, home to colorado state university. then we'll be looking at, um, as far as democrats, we'll be looking at boulder and denver and seeing, you know, if they're getting their numbers the way they want to. and the democrats have paid considerable attention to the southwest corner of the state, um, la plata county, home to durango, so we'll be looking to see if they're banking lots of votes in the southwest corner of the state as well. >> check out c-span's campaign 2012 web site where you can watch the candidates on the campaign trail as well as their latest ads and web videos. also check our social media section to see what the candidates, reporters and other viewers are saying about the presidential race. it's all at c-span.org/campaign2012. >> as part of our campaign 2012 coverage, c-span is bringing you house, senate and governor deb
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)